Reentering the workforce after a drug conviction

People charged with drug crimes in Wisconsin may spend time behind bars depending on the severity of their circumstances. This time away from all of the normal obligations in their life could create uncertainty and even anxiety when it is time to reenter society.

One aspect of getting back to their prior life is the process of finding employment. Some people may feel inadequate and under-qualified when they begin applying for a new job. Combining confidence and applicable life experience can help them to make a positive first impression.

Highlighting skills

Despite the circumstances that resulted in a drug charge, chances are many people still possess valuable skills. Their ability to market their skills can provide instrumental support in their effort to secure employment. According to FlexJobs, people should focus on their strengths. One strategy that experts suggest is for people to describe how their experiences have enabled them to develop strengths. Then, they can highlight how those strengths will make a difference in the workplace.

For example, someone who spent their time behind bars volunteering and helping other inmates, could highlight their ability to lead a group of people. They could focus on their people skills, interpersonal communication and enthusiasm as positive characteristics that will make a difference in the workplace.

Demonstrating qualifications

Perhaps one of the most important things people can do is to practice consistency. Once they list their qualifications and discuss them in an interview, it is time for them to provide reliability, dependability and consistency. One man shared his job experience with NPR and said that recurring and frequent visits with his probation officer compromised his job. Because this is the case for a lot of people, they would benefit from looking for jobs with increased flexibility.

Equally as important is their effort to communicate regularly with management. They should provide an honest assessment of their job availability, especially if they are also participating in a recovery program that requires additional commitment.