What is the MORE Act and how will it affect Wisconsin?

If you use marijuana recreationally or have drug charges related to marijuana, you might have heard of the MORE Act. The Act first saw its introduction to the house in the summer of 2019 and continues to make its way through the channels.

If the bill makes it to the top and passes successfully, it may lead to the legalization of marijuana. Several Democratic candidates ran on the promise of legalizing marijuana. Now, that Democrats control the House and the Senate, this could become a reality.

What does the bill include?

Congress.gov explains that the bill removes marijuana as a scheduled substance. This simultaneously removes criminal penalties for growing, selling, possessing and using marijuana. Below, you will find additional proposals from the bill:

  • Requires the Bureau of Labor Statistics to include information on cannabis workers in its publishing of labor information
  • Makes SBA loans available to businesses in the cannabis industry
  • Tasks the Government Accountability Office with the job of studying how cannabis legalization might affect society
  • Creates a trust fund for receiving 5% tax on cannabis products
  • Proposes the use of this trust fund for redeveloping neighborhoods disproportionately affected by the war on drugs
  • Prohibits immigration benefits denial due to cannabis-related incidents

How far along has it progressed?

Former president, Trump, vowed not to legalize cannabis, which may explain why the House waited until November 27 to begin addressing the bill. As of December 4, 2020, the House agreed to and passed the bill at 228 to 164. Regular protocol requires the bill to move on to the Senate.

Several states pioneered the way for cannabis legalization in America. However, the federal government’s disagreement led to some discrepancies in the treatment of marijuana-related incidents, especially across state lines and within private organizations. Federal legalization could finally create consistency and ease confusion. This affects not just Wisconsin but every American state.