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Did your health condition lead to OWI charges in Wisconsin?

Operating while impaired is a criminal charge no Wisconsin motorist wants to face. The penalties under conviction can be quite severe. There is a lot of controversy surrounding the topic of breath tests. Some people say a driver is wise to refuse to comply to a roadside test; others believe it is always best to submit upon request. What many people do not realize, however, is that numerous issues can prompt a false positive on a breath test, which can lead to an OWI arrest.

OWI: Should you submit to a Breathalyzer test?

Getting pulled over by a Wisconsin police officer can be a disconcerting experience. If the officer asks the driver to exit the vehicle, there's a good chance it is because he or she is suspected of drunk driving. OWI charges carry potentially severe penalties that could include jail time. Many drivers wonder if they should refuse to take a Breathalyzer test when a police officer requests it.

Defend your rights in criminal proceedings regarding OWI

When you got arrested during a Wisconsin traffic stop, it might have felt like the earth dropped out from under you. You knew you had to call your family. It was also likely the situation was going to interfere with your job, namely because you'd have to request time off for court appointments. Facing OWI charges can be damaging to your personal and professional reputation, even if you ultimately obtain a positive outcome in court.

U.S. Supreme Court issues divided ruling on OWI in Wisconsin

The U.S. Supreme Court handed down a ruling in a 5-4 vote that pertains to Wisconsin drivers. More specifically, the ruling has to do with people who are unconscious whom police suspected of OWI, moments before the individuals became unconscious. Four justices expressed strong dissenting opinions on the matter.

Wisconsin OWI law stands, rules US Supreme Court

Wisconsin drivers may want to update themselves on a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that stemmed from an OWI case that occurred in this state. The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution protects people against unlawful searches or seizures. A challenge was issued in court a while back, asserting that a man's personal rights had been violated.

Woman accused of OWI in Wisconsin

Wisconsin prosecutors aggressively pursue conviction when they believe they have evidence that a defendant has broken drunk driving laws. Penalties for OWI can be severe, including expensive fines and, perhaps, even jail time. One woman is in a heap of trouble after police took her into custody while she was carrying children as passengers in her vehicle.

OWI conviction may impede prospective employment process

It is well-known that being convicted of drunk driving in Wisconsin or any other state can have long-lasting repercussions. As opposed to minor traffic violations, OWI is considered a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the circumstances. In addition to penalties such as jail time, fines or license suspension, a drunk driving conviction can also negatively affect one's personal and professional life.

Did a Wisconsin police officer ask you to take a PAS due to OWI?

Getting pulled over in a traffic stop by a Wisconsin police officer can be an unsettling experience. There is no way to predict how such situations will end. Young drivers who have never encountered legal problems before may be quite intimidated to see a uniformed police officer approaching their drivers' side windows. If the officer asks the driver to take a preliminary alcohol screening test (PAS), it's safe to bet that he or she suspects that person of operating while intoxicated, or OWI.

Man convicted of OWI in single vehicle crash sentenced to prison

When a Wisconsin motor vehicle collision occurs, it sometimes leads to criminal charges against one or more drivers. Such situations often include suspected OWI. However, situations involving suspected drunk driving may also lead to addition criminal charges, especially if the accident resulted in injury or death to another person.

Did a night out in Wisconsin lead to OWI charges against you?

If you go out to eat with a group of friends, drink a beer or glass of wine with your supper and later drive yourself home, are you breaking the law? The answer is that it depends on numerous factors. For instance, you must be age 21 or older to legally consume alcohol, and your blood alcohol content level must never be .08 or higher while operating a motor vehicle. These and other issues can lead to OWI charges in Wisconsin.

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